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  Click here to go to the first staff post in this thread.   Thread: Real Road Track Surface

  1. #1
    Bill Malicoat's Avatar
     

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    Oct 2010
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    Real Road Track Surface

    Will it work with more than one material on the track mesh itself? Also with more than one grip level for each material.

    For example, a concrete patch will have a different "base" grip in the TDF then the rest of the tarmac. Will the rubber lay down work seamless with the two different materials?

  2. #2
    LesiU's Avatar

     rFactor 2 Validated PC Specification Where I race Modding Group: SimRacingPL 

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    Oct 2010
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    Because rubber layer is a separate layer above the main road, I think it should provide consistent grip levels on both surfaces (as long as the same amount were layed out on both of them). I'm wondering, what happens before you hit a rubber layer thick enough to say, that properties of surface beeing below rubber doesn't matter. Will you still feel a difference between tarmac with some rubber vs concrete patch with some (same amount) rubber?

    EDIT: Right... I forgot it's the shader using all those maps (they are not as separate layers). Sorry for confusion.
    Last edited by LesiU; 01-12-12 at 03:30 PM.

  3.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #3
    Luc Van Camp's Avatar ISI Staff

     rFactor 2 Validated PC Specification @ISITrackTeam 

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    As long as the objects and materials are set up for RealRoad, you shouldn't have any problem with multiple materials. Different TDF values should also work fine.
    RealRoad is not layered on top of the mesh, it is integrated into the RealRoad shader.

  4. #4
    Rayo_McQueen's Avatar
     

    Registered
    Sep 2011
    I have read the documentation of Track Tecnology, but there is some things that i don't understand.

    Do you share an example of track with realroad material, please?

    Thanks.

  5.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #5
    Luc Van Camp's Avatar ISI Staff

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    We plan to share a piece of Joesville with all the new stuff applied.

    I'm not sure if I understand your question correctly, but I think each tyre influences RealRoad, rather than the car in a whole.

  6.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #6
    Luc Van Camp's Avatar ISI Staff

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    Right, I see what you mean. RealRoad is poly-based, meaning the grip, etc. will change per polygon as you drive over it.

  7. #7
    Robin Frischkopf's Avatar
     

    New Member
    Jan 2012
    Does the track really get darker on the racing line with all categories? In F1 for example you always see quite the opposite and the racing line gets cleaner all the time while the outside of corners gets darker and dirtier by contrast.

  8. #8
    LesiU's Avatar

     rFactor 2 Validated PC Specification Where I race Modding Group: SimRacingPL 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luc Van Camp View Post
    Right, I see what you mean. RealRoad is poly-based, meaning the grip, etc. will change per polygon as you drive over it.
    Does it mean, we have to create tracks with very small polygons for roads, in order to get what DmitryRUS showed on the second picture (trace only where we actually drived, not the whole width of a car and some more)?

  9.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #9
    Luc Van Camp's Avatar ISI Staff

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    Right now some of the logic behind RealRoad generation is still missing, so the effect isn't quite what will be in the final version. Braking zones do get darker even in F1. RealRoad makes a distinction between 'rubber' and 'marbles', so it will be possible to get a better balance between the two once the final code is implemented.

    Dmitry's method is indeed achievable if the surface polygon density is high enough. In the end, we need to find a compromise between track and car quality. Remember that each poly requires calculations as it is being 'tagged' by a tyre, so the more polys you tag, the heavier CPU usage will be. The great thing is that, if computer development stays at its current pace, this feature is scalable, and eventually we could end up having really detailed 3D surfaces .

    I personally wouldn't mind running box cars on a high poly surface right now. I don't like cars, that's why I'm a track guy . Other people prefer render models driving on low poly track surfaces. In the end, it's all about finding a good compromise between cars and tracks. I can say I'm happy that rF2 puts more emphasis on the track surface. That's where a lot of polys will go .

  10. #10
    MaXyM's Avatar

     rFactor 2 Validated PC Specification Facebook profile @@MaXyM_SRPL 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robin Frischkopf View Post
    Does the track really get darker on the racing line with all categories? In F1 for example you always see quite the opposite and the racing line gets cleaner all the time while the outside of corners gets darker and dirtier by contrast.
    Quite all sims do/show it in wrong way. IN reality there are at least 3 effects on the road
    1. "ironed" rubber into surface - it reflects light easily, including blue light of the sky. That's why best line is going to be brighter, especially in some angles. Depending on racing series, best line trajectory it may turn into single wide stripe or into 2 stripes (made by left and right wheels separately). It is mostly visible in corners, but also a bit on straights
    2. darker part appearing on one or both sides of the first one, usually in corners)- its covered by particles of the rubber thrown out from the tyres. It doesn't reflect light, rather diffuse it. It is dirtiest part of the surface. You can see it often during modern F1 race. Comparing to simulations you will be surprised: sims makes best line darker, when in reality part of surface next to BL are darker
    3. skids - it is fresh rubber just worn from tyres. It does not reflect light (you can see it made in wrong way in C.A.R.S - skids are brighter which is incorrect)

    There are also braking zones which utilizes a lot of all those types of effect. You can imagine it. There are a lot of "ironed" rubber, fresh skids and a lot of dirt.

    Quote Originally Posted by Luc Van Camp View Post
    The great thing is that, if computer development stays at its current pace, this feature is scalable, and eventually we could end up having really detailed 3D surfaces .
    What about moving RealRoad data into second layer which is responsible for microbumps etc. It will cause no need to create high density vissible 3d model o surface

  11. #11
    LesiU's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luc Van Camp View Post
    Dmitry's method is indeed achievable if the surface polygon density is high enough. In the end, we need to find a compromise between track and car quality. Remember that each poly requires calculations as it is being 'tagged' by a tyre, so the more polys you tag, the heavier CPU usage will be. The great thing is that, if computer development stays at its current pace, this feature is scalable, and eventually we could end up having really detailed 3D surfaces .
    When you have transient weather conditions, the tricky part is to stay only on drying line - which in fact is as two drying stripes, if you are on slicks. So when you guys said that rubber is layed down for each car, each tyre, I assumed that also works for drying line and it's exacly like that - for each tyre contact patch.

    Instead of tagging polys, can't it be done based on it's relative position in track (based on AIW or other data?)? You have all physical data (including tread width for each tyre) to know exactly, where each tyre is on the track at the moment and do all rubber-in/dry-out calculations based on that?

  12.   This is the last staff post in this thread.   #12
    Luc Van Camp's Avatar ISI Staff

     rFactor 2 Validated PC Specification @ISITrackTeam 

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    Belgium
    Theoretically, that would seem like a different, possible approach. Eventually though, this data needs to be sent from the CPU to the GPU, which needs to process the data onto the mesh. I think RealRoad is a very good compromise at the moment.

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